Articles Posted in counsel fees

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For attorneys and litigants alike, the legal fees attendant to the handling of a divorce matter are an important consideration. When it comes to legal fees, time is money. Because our Rules of Court prohibit the handling of divorce cases on a contingent fee basis, legal services are billed based upon the actual time spent working on the case at an hourly rate and charged against an initial retainer amount to be paid by the client. When prospective client asks how much in legal fees the divorce will cost, I explain that there are too many variables to give a precise estimate, including the number and complexity of the issues involved, the level to which those issues are contested, the reasonableness of the other spouse and/or attorney in regards to their positions, cooperation and/or course of conduct during the process, and the extent litigation or court involvement is needed to resolve those issues. Several years ago I wrote a blog post suggesting five ways a client might be able to reduce their legal fees in a divorce. However, prospective clients sometimes ask how we come up with the initial retainer fee amount requested to commence their representation in a given case. Candidly, I have found that there is no set formula or uniform approach upon which a given attorney or law firm will quote an initial retainer amount to a prospective client, and that is true with this firm. However, as with the overall legal fees that might be incurred in a given case, I explain that there are a number of variables which bear upon the amount of an initial retainer. This blog post will address some of them.checkbook-register-300x200

First, it is important to discuss what an initial retainer is not. From the outset a prospective client must not be given the impression that the amount of an initial retainer represents the actual or full amount of legal fees their case will cost. If fee disputes arise, this is often a common refrain clients make. At the outset, the attorney must make clear to the client that the amount being requested for an initial retainer is just a baseline amount to commence representation in the matter, an amount sufficient to cover a core level of anticipated legal services based upon the attorney or firm’s hourly rates. The client must understand that the total legal fees may likely be more, depending upon the variables noted above and the facts and circumstances of their case. That should be reflected in writing, preferably in the Retainer Agreement itself to be entered into between the attorney and client as mandated by Rule 5:3-5(a). Nor should a retainer amount be driven by an emotional reaction to a client or his/her circumstances. Both the attorney and client must recognize that they are still entering into a professional business relationship, and the financial terms of that relationship should be determined accordingly.

Again, what goes into setting a retainer fee varies from attorney to attorney or firm to firm. Some attorneys have established fixed retainer amounts for given types of cases and stick to those amounts – a retainer to handle a divorce is such and such. Some may have established fixed retainer amounts depending upon whether certain issues are involved. Obviously, the amount of a retainer fee will also depend upon the hourly rates of the attorney(s) handling the matter – the higher the hourly rates, the larger the retainer necessary to cover a baseline amount of legal services. For some attorneys, the retainer fee may simply be a multiple of their hourly rates times a baseline number of hours. The number of hours may reflect an attorney’s estimate of the minimum amount of legal services a case may take if everything – and I mean everything – went perfectly.

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There is a saying among realtors that the first offer is usually the best offer. Why is that?  Because the first offer is made when the property is freshly on the market. When real estate sits buyers6a3146dbdf81597192112ac03d77c7e4-300x200 become suspicious. There is also the cost of holding the property to factor in.  The first offer likely saves the seller from incurring more tax, mortgage, utility and upkeep costs. There is a lot to be said about the psychological benefits of a fast deal as well. No worry, no uncertainty, no sleepless nights. Continue reading

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Pursuant to New Jersey statutes, and a common term in lawyers’ retainer agreements, is often a provision for the attorney to retain what is referred to as a charging lien in the assets of the marital estate to allow an attorney to be paid for legal services. Usually the existence of attorney’s right to a charging lien is merely academic as matters glide through the system. Occasionally, however, issues arise regarding an attorney’s fee which require court intervention. Pursuant to N.J.S.A. 2A:13-15, an attorney is entitled to a lien against a marital assets in controversy for the purpose of the payment of legal fees. The attorney’s lien is an inchoate right that attaches to the assets of the marital estate upon the completion of the ttorney’s involvement in the matter. Continue reading

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One consideration that comes up in almost every divorce action is the question of whether a spouse can request that the other spouse pay their counsel fees. Awards of counsel fees in New Jersey matrimonial cases are completely up to the discretion of the judges, and the Appellate Division generally will not reverse such decisions unless the judge abused his/her discretion. Eaton v. Grau, 368 N.J. Super. 443, 454 (App. Div. 2006). Judges’ discretion is not entirely unfettered, however, because judges still must address the standards set forth in the statutes, rules and case law. Continue reading