Articles Tagged with collaborative law

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Only a court can grant a divorce. A court can also decide issues of custody and parenting time, alimony and child support, the distribution of property, as well as other claims incident to the 7df9a9b7f03c042ccdfba2b0252bb070-300x200dissolution of a marriage. However, a court need not decide these issues as the parties themselves have the power to resolve them–and in the vast majority of cases, they do. Often the parties are able to settle their financial and custodial issues whether with or without the assistance of counsel, during the course of an ongoing litigation process. However, in recent years there has been a growing acceptance of dispute resolution methods, whether as an alternative to conventional litigation or as a compliment with respect thereto, to assist parties to resolve their marital issues. Continue reading

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Governor Chris Christie signed into law the New Jersey Collaborative Law Act (the “Act”) on September 10, 2014. The intent of the legislation is to provide uniformity in collaborative law throughout the State in family law disputes. Collaborative law affords parties a way to resolve family law disputes without intervention of the courts. The parties work with a team of professionals to reach a settlement agreement. Continue reading